NEUROPSYCHIATRY and BEHAVIORAL NEUROLOGY | PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY
FORENSICS | RESEARCH | CONSCIOUSNESS | PHILOSOPHY | BOOKS | LITERATURE
PERSPECTIVES | CLINICAL | DÉJÀ VU | INTERESTING AREAS | ETHICS | CONTACT

KEY ARTICLES: CONSCIOUSNESS | DOUBLE BLIND | HEAD INJURY | NARCOLEPSY | PAROXYSMAL DISORDERS | PRESCRIPTION PRINCIPLES | TARDIVE DYSKINESIA

Enduring Interest: Generic Substitution | Genius | Groundbreaking Paradigm Shifts | Zmail

Outside intelligence links
ISIR - International Society for Intelligence Research (worldwide society examining intelligence and IQ)
ISPE - International Society for Philosophical Enquiry (largest worldwide very high IQ society [1 in 1000])

Exceptional Intelligence

During 2008, Dr Vernon Neppe introduced new  theoretical ideason exceptional intelligence.
Dr Neppe presented data in this regard to the International Society for Intelligence Research in Atlanta in December 2008.
Neppe VM: Intelligence assessment by history taking in child prodigies with adult achievement—the SCHIQ, in International Society for Intelligence Research Conference Book. Decatur, GA, 2008, p 21

Limitations of the current testing of exceptionally intelligent individuals.  Vernon M Neppe MD, PhD, FRSSAf, DFAPA, BN&NP, DPM, MMed, Director, Pacific Neuropsychiatric Institute, Seattle, WA (Adj Full Professor, Dept of Psychiatry, St Louis University, St Louis, MO. www.PNI.org;  psyche@PNI.org; 206 527 6289

Quantifying the validity of current high “IQ test” scores of exceptional intelligence  reflects potentially significant errors.

1.    Does their construct validity reflect accurate gradations of very high intelligence?

2.    Does their face validity strongly correlate with specific outside creative, occupational and educational achievements?

3.    Is the statistical validity based on limited sampling reflecting “normally distributed” curves at  ≥ 4d or even ≥ 3.4d IQ? Is there e.g., any “twisted pear” or bimodal curve?

4.    Does IQ testing focussing on the  “convergent” questions (e.g. difficult to solve problems of mathematical or symbolic or logic kind) correlate strongly with “divergent” measures that could more accurately reflect exceptional intelligence?

Whereas these purported IQs certainly measure a high level of accomplishment on these tests, there is a known lower correlation of the “g factor” at “high IQ” levels: These “convergent IQ tests”, despite being ingenious at times, may not necessarily reflect increased intelligence itself, but a related skill subset.

This is so as creative intelligence (I describe this as the “c factor”) is usually ignored as not easily measurable. This may involve ostensibly divergent skills  added to the requisite grounding convergent measures, This results in multiple appropriate creative answers complicating accurate measurement of correct answers in these potentially very exceptional individuals.


Citation
Neppe VM: Intelligence assessment by history taking in child prodigies with adult achievement—the SCHIQ, in International Society for Intelligence Research Conference Book. Decatur, GA, 2008, p 21

 


 

 

 


Copyright ©1997-2006 Pacific Neuropsychiatric Institute